Friday, November 03, 2006

 

Islam and science: 'Nature' journal special (Open Access/Free)

In many countries with large Muslim populations the pendulum of power is swinging away from secular (but mostly undemocratic) government back to where it was for many centuries: to Islamist regimes, and Islamic law. What does this mean for Muslim scientists and science? For a very long time, Muslim states have scored badly on measures of science and technology. Will things be any better or worse under the new Islamist governments?

Nature 'Special' Contents:

THE ISLAMIC WORLD (Interactive World Map)
NEWS FEATURES/ANALYSIS
TIMELINE
EDITORIAL
COMMENTARIES
PODCAST
WHAT DO YOU THINK?
ARCHIVE (Not Open Access at the time of writing)
EXTERNAL LINKS

Supported by the Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Sciences

Continued at "Islam and science: 'Nature' journal special (Open Access/Free)"
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Comments:
It seems to me the term "Muslim Scientist" is an oxymoron today as few, if any, major contributions to science have been made by muslims. Granted, in their prime (the period between 8th and 14th century CE), muslim scientists and scholars contributed greatly to society. There must be a reason for this based in the religion itself. Perhaps it is seen today (and in the past 6 centuries) as a Western evil and therefor avoided - who knows. One thing is for sure, with all the oil money being horded by OPEC, lack of funding should not be an issue.
 
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